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Book recommendation thread - Fantasy

Discussion in 'Banter' started by jkerr, 2 Feb 2012.

  1. jkerr

    jkerr Builder, hermit

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    I was talking to Sup about doing this about a month ago, so I'd better get to it! I'll keep this thread to fantasy book recommendations, since it's mostly the only genre of books I read... I have 3 older brothers, and 2 of them were always avid fantasy novel readers, so I was able to read the ones they recommended - I could read theirs, and only read the best ones :)

    I'll start with just a few, since the first is a series of 5 books... George R R Martin's Song of Ice and Fire! Excellent series, but I should state probably at least PG 14 or maybe 16 for you young readers out there... Really great, very gritty and Realistic - if you lived in this world, it may very well be like this. He has a lot of really great characters, some you hate then get to know more about and learn that maybe they're not all bad - confuse you about whether they're truly 'bad guys' or not... great stuff.
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  2. jkerr

    jkerr Builder, hermit

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    The other one I'll recommend for now is another truly Excellent read, a real page turner. This is the first in a series, by Brandon Sanderson. He has a knack for coming up for completely unique magic systems - I've also read his Mistborn trilogy, another good one, and it's magic system is completely new and imaginative again! Anyway, this is the first (and only so far) in a trilogy (i think), called the Way of Kings. This one could probably be read by slightly younger readers, maybe 14? (I find it hard to judge these things). Anyway, I've re-reading it now, really enjoyed this one - The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson:
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  3. VladTheImposter

    VladTheImposter Addicted

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    If you love fantasy type books, you will love this series ( I could be wrong but they are damn good. Not good as say Lord of the Rings but something tasty to occupy your reading time. )

    [​IMG]



    If you are a science fiction fan the below series will blow your mind. They are probably my top favorite science fiction novels (They both are series by the way) ;p

    [​IMG][​IMG]
     
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  4. Vork Moin

    Vork Moin Addicted

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    I tend to prefer Sci-nonfi ;p
    If you do too, READ THIS NAO!
    [​IMG]
    Crud, too many pixels. XL
     
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  5. MrHobbits

    MrHobbits The Angry Panda Staff Member

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    I'm going to plug in here:

    Robin Hobb:
    The Assassin's Apprentice (book 1)
    The Royal Assassin (book 2)
    Assassin's Quest (book 3)

    Followed by:
    The Tawny Man series
    and that's all I've read so far.. the other series'ses'ses all stem and provide a good background on the first set of books. Read those first. I recommend them to everyone I see reading any sort of fantasy book. Best I've ever read. (Better than the Sword Of Shannara series, which was also awesome)
     
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  6. jkerr

    jkerr Builder, hermit

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    I was seriously going to post that series next! Read it twice, loved it! The next few were pretty good too - the liveship traders and the dragon keepers (can't remember the name exactly)...
     
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  7. TheRowan

    TheRowan Well-Known Member VIP

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    Well i tend to read book intended for teenagers so they might be a bit below your reading age but i Really love the Eragon Series.

    Eragon
    Eldest
    Brisingr
    Inheritance
     
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  8. Dhugg

    Dhugg Borkerer of Worlds

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    R. A. Salvatore's older books.
     
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  9. VladTheImposter

    VladTheImposter Addicted

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    I love the Inheritance Cycle series (sure they are a bit young) but still good books. By the way, I loathe Chris for the ending of the last book ;/
     
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  10. TheRowan

    TheRowan Well-Known Member VIP

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    Yeah i agree.
     
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  11. MrHobbits

    MrHobbits The Angry Panda Staff Member

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    Yeah, Im still in the middle of "Fools Errand" right now. I dont get much time to read, as when I start I can often lose track of the world around me! LOL!
     
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  12. Improper

    Improper Member

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    Stephen King's The Dark Tower series is pretty awesome. I'm only on the third book so far though

    The Last Gunslinger
    The Drawing of the Three
    The Waste Lands
    Wolves of the Calla
    Wizard and Glass
    Song of Suzannah
    The Dark Tower

    I think Wolves of the Calla and Wizard and Glass might be the other way around...
     
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  13. jkerr

    jkerr Builder, hermit

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    Cool series - I thought the Drawing of the Three was the best book, then it kinda went downhill for me from there. Most of Wizard and Glass was cool (you'll know the bit I mean when you get there) but I really lost interest after that, found it hard to get through the rest... Maybe you'll like em all though! :)
     
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  14. Improper

    Improper Member

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    I'm in the last 1/4[ish] of The Waste Lands.

    and The Drawing of the Three was cool. Even when the woman was spouting all that racist nonsense.
     
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  15. SupWithThat

    SupWithThat Banhammer be strong.

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    Some books of note I've read in the last few months:

    Shogun - James Clavell

    Simply put, one of the greatest works of fiction in human history. James Clavell was the definition of a character writer and thoroughly deserves his place of massively high regard in the hearts of minds of many avid readers. I grew up reading his books and have never stopped re-reading them, I do so religiously - When I re'read Shogun before Christmas I think it might have been my eighth or ninth time reading it.

    Gai-Jin - James Clavell

    The last book in Clavell's 'Asian Saga', in which he delved into the roots of his love/hate relationship with Asia and his inner battle with racism, all framed in one of the best pieces of character drama ever written.

    A Song of Ice and Fire - George R.R Martin
    - Game of Thrones
    - Clash of Kings
    - Storm of Swords (can be hard to find the two-in-one hardback edition in the UK)
    - Feast for Crows
    - A Dance With Dragons

    George R.R Martin far surpasses his fantasy predecessors, such as Tolkien, in that he not only writes quality period character drama, but he writes plots which are so deeply embroiled in human nature and grit that you can truly believe his world exists. Martin spent the first years of the Ice and Fire saga criminally underrated and even now receives criticism more for the fact that the reading public simply wasn't, and isn't , ready for his brand of fantasy. He doesn't hesitate to kill your favourite characters in the span of a page, nor does he hesitate to go his way with his saga, regardless of what even the most stalwart fans may think.

    Rubicon - Tom Holland

    Not much to say, it documents the life span of the Roman Republic, but in too few pages and in too little detail. Probably one of the lesser historical books I've read, tiny too.




    But, yeah - I read like crazy so I'll keep this thread posted regularly with what I'm reading.
     
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  16. Sushimitzu

    Sushimitzu Enthusiast

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    Neaera - Rubikon
     
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  17. jkerr

    jkerr Builder, hermit

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    #17
  18. the_amber_trap

    the_amber_trap Calm down so I can be the angry one. Staff Member

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    James Clavell is definitely a talented author, Sup, but I would caution people reading them to remember that they are definitely fiction. They sound so authoritative in their writing that it's tempting to take the "facts" presented at face value instead of the make-believe that they are.
    Shogun was definitely the best in his "Asian saga," though King Rat was a very good read as well (perhaps because it had significantly fewer racist overtones as it follows a bunch of white dudes in a POW camp.) I can't remember most of the rest of the saga. Maybe I should dig it out and reread it.

    I'm currently reading a very interesting author who bridges the gap between fantasy, science fiction, and the macabre. If you've been on the internet for longer than five minutes, you've surely seen a horrid (or adorable, depending on the person interpreting it) beast with green skin, bat-like wings, and an octopus for a face. This is Cthulu, a monstrous "old one" from the mythos penned by H. P. Lovecraft.
    Lovecraft was known more for his short stories (in fact he wrote them almost exclusively), and frequently draws comparison to Poe, though the horror in his writing does not dwell on the supernatural as much as Poe, and instead fosters a sense of insignificance.

    Another very fun piece of fiction is The Count of Monte Cristo, though I can't think of anything by Dumas that I haven't adored.
     
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  19. TheRowan

    TheRowan Well-Known Member VIP

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    #19
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  20. SupWithThat

    SupWithThat Banhammer be strong.

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    Yeah, definitely fiction - though grounded in real events with an altered timeline and character names. Shogun was my favourite, purely due to it's central premise being the political intrigue in the build up to the battle of Sekigahara.
     
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